Running tips to keep your feet happy

Running tips to keep your feet happy

Keep Your Feet As Dry As Possible Keep the skin of the feet as dry as possible during a long run; this can be done by good footwear design – using breathable shoe upper materials or designs that include vents and also by the repeated application of
surgical spirit which can act as an astringent, reducing the amount of sweat produced.
Training Your Running Shoes
Always wear your trainers in at least 100 miles prior to a marathon.
Good Lacing Techniques
Lacing your trainers firmly and high up the shoe, using the top eyelets to secure the laces and prevent slippage is best way to
reduce shear-creating movements.
Wear Acrylic Socks
Acrylic fibre socks can reduce the frequency and size of blisters in long distance runners.
Treat Problematic Flat Feet
Blisters under the arch may commonly result due to flat feet. By consulting a podiatrist the movements and function of a flat foot can be addressed with foot orthoses and footwear advice etc…
If this doesn’t work…..
Don’t intentionally burst blisters – risk of infection
Dress a burst blister using sterile dressings on clean skin and remove further friction by using blister pads and by following the above advice.
Seek podiatric care where necessary to remove flaps of skin.
If there any signs of infection (redness, bad smell, pus, swelling) become apparent at the site of a blister seek medical assistance.
Warming up prior to your run and cooling down on completion of run should always be done.
Consider the terrain you run on. It is not uncommon for an athlete to experience symptoms which can be resolved by the
introduction of grass instead of tarmac or by the elimination of downhill running. If possible join a running club for support and advice from experienced runners and coaches regarding training routines
Increase your weekly mileage or time spent running gradually by no more than 10% per week, and ensure sufficient rest or easy days are included in any training program. This will allow the body time to recover and adapt to the demands of training and reduce the risk of overuse injury.
MARATHON RUNNING
Running outdoors in the fresh air is a fantastic way of keeping fit, but it can subject the body to considerable stress. Every step a runner takes the foot generates forces equivalent to at least three and a half times body weight. This force is absorbed by the foot and lower limb and transferred to enable forward movement. Lower limb overuse injuries may commonly result from this repeated stress of body tissues and can often be associated with faulty foot function and poor alignment
for example; Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, shin splints, patello-femoral knee pain, ilio-tibial band syndrome, hip pain and low back pain…
A biomechanical examination of the foot and lower limb can determine the ability of the runner to withstand the trauma of running and identify possible foot types and structural problems which may become a cause of pain and result in injury in prolonged running.
Functional foot orthoses for your trainers can be effective if a lower limb abnormality is identified to reduce excess stress and strain and possible overuse injury.
RUNNING SHOES TIPS
• Cross trainers are ideal shoes forrunning.
• Wear the same socks that you intend to run in for a proper fitting.
• Buy your running shoes later on in the day when your foot is at its widest.
• Get your feet measured every time you buy running shoes.
• Change your running shoes after 350- 400 miles as the mid sole and the heel begins to wear out and is less supportive. The shoes can still be worn for every day wear but are not suitable enough for the stress of running.
• Ensure you have a finger width length from your great toe so that that you do not damage your toes while running.
• Check that you have strong laces and do not fasten tightly or too loosely as this can result in a loss of stability and over pronation (flattening of the foot).
• NEVER wear new running shoes for a long race or marathon; always run at least 100 miles in them before you run a race.
SIGNS OF WEAR AND TEAR
Shoe wear on the outer area of the heel is normal but excessive wear on the inner heel should be checked out by a podiatrist. The runner may have severe over pronation (flat feet) which can lead to overuse injury. Many short distance runners will show increased forefoot wear as there is more pressure being applied to this area. Too much shoe wear on the outer area of the forefoot and heel area can be a result of a rarer foot type called over supination.
We are conveniently located in Old Harlow. If you live or work in Harlow, Sawbridgeworth, Nazeing, Roydon, Hatfield Heath, Sheering, Hatfield Broad Oak, North Weald, or Epping why not pop in and see how we can help you run to the best of your ability!
Taken from 1fife.
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